Morayo Brown: Why some women need exit plan in marriage

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Morayo Afolabi-Brown, the TV host, says some women need a long-term exit plan in marriage

The media personality spoke in a post put out via her Instagram handle on Thursday night.

Although she didn’t give context to her comment, Brown said no marriage is worth suffering high blood pressure over.

“This thing called marriage. Some women need a long-term exit plan. You’ve got to know when to move. No man is worth a High BP. It’s not easy but possible,” she wrote.

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Morayo Afolabi-Brown is a TV host and the only daughter of Alao Aka-Bashorun, the late Nigeria Bar Association (NBA) president.

She was the deputy director of programmes at TVC News and host of the breakfast show Your View before she resigned in May 2019.

She is married to Femi Afolabi-Brown, a lawyer, and blessed with three children.

Morayo’s views comes as many public figures continue to share their takes on relationships, who to marry, and when to leave a union.

READ ALSO:Actor Kunle Afod’s wife announces marriage crash

In 2016, Enoch Adeboye, general overseer of the Redeemed Christian Church of God (RCCG), advised the youth against marrying ladies who are weak in prayers.

Andrea Ekeng Inyang, the special assistant to Ben Ayade, Rivers state governor, on strategic communication, also urged men not to marry ladies who drink beer in public.

Harrysong, the singer, similarly urged his colleagues never to marry women who are addicted to social media.

Ini-Dima Okojie, the actress, earlier spoke about what should be the breaking point in an abusive relationship.

“You come across a person of influence in a field and wonder how they keep putting up with similar situations. It’s not easy to make the decision to leave when you’re broken mentally,” she told TheCable Lifestyle in an interview.

“For me personally, if the assault happens the first time, you leave. It’s black and white. But what was interesting to see, from the victim’s perspective, is that it didn’t matter the age, social status, or class of the victims.”